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Feb 6 2017 | Posted In: In the News
. . . He also worked with the Tuna Research and the Conservation Center of Stanford University and with the Monterey Bay Aquarium where he was again a pioneer. He developed the surgical techniques for placing "archival" tags in tuna to record their trans-oceanic sojourns in stunning detail. Tom...
Feb 3 2017 | Posted In: In the News
There remains a question as old as the sea: Why do blue whales, the largest animals on earth, eat tiny krill? The answer: Because they can. But really, how can they? It takes a tremendous amount of energy to sustain a 150-ton whale, let alone provide the additional nourishment needed to support...
Jan 31 2017 | Posted In: In the News, Publications
Research from Stanford University's Hopkins Marine Station has identified a substance in oil that's to blame for the cardiotoxicity seen in fish exposed to crude oil spills. More than a hazard for marine life exposed to oil, the contaminant this team identified is abundant in air pollution and...
Jan 31 2017 | Posted In: Publications
Animals’ exchanges are considered the most effective route of between-farm infectious disease transmission. However, despite being often overlooked, the infection spread due to contaminated equipment, vehicles, or personnel proved to be important for several livestock epidemics. This study...
Jan 25 2017 | Posted In: In the News
Join us at the Sanctuary Exploration Center in Santa Cruz on February 10 from 6 to 7:30 pm to honor this year's Ricketts Memorial Award winner, Dr. Fiorenza Micheli. She will be giving a talk about how natural ecosystems and coastal communities are responding to climate change, and the importance...
Dec 30 2016 | Posted In: Publications
We estimate cumulative impacts to California's Marine Protected Area. Land- and ocean-based impacts are greatest along the central and southern coast. Climate impacts are estimated to be high across the entire California coast. Climate impacts may be reduced more effectively by limiting the...
Dec 19 2016 | Posted In: In the News
Peek into a tide pool along the shore and you may see a starfish clinging quietly to a rock. But that secure adulthood comes at the expense of a harrowing larval journey. Tiny starfish larvae - each smaller than a grain of rice - spend 60 days and 60 nights paddling the open ocean, feeding to...

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