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Confocal Microscopy

Confocal microscopy is a relative new technique that allows biologists to "optically section" a sample. In combination with a pinhole in the microscope's optical path, a laser scans the object being examined, allowing the observer to focus very narrowly on a single plane. By repeating this process on a series of planes, one can construct a three dimensional image of the sample. By eliminating out-of-plane light, the technique also provides improved resolution.

The David Epel Microscopy Center contains a Zeiss LSM700 confocal microscope (inverted) with the ZEN software.

Research availability:

The microscope is available for use to qualified researchers from local universities and research facilities (Monterey Bay region).

 

Laser wavelenths: 

405, 488, 555, 635

Objectives:

Dry: Neofluor 10x & 20x, Plan APO 40 oil & C-APO 40 water

 


Questions?

Please contact Chris Patton, cpatton@stanford.edu for more information and to arrange training and use.