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Planetary Health

people and researchers
Apr 12 2018

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In the News

Open to Stanford students and postdocs

BIO 270 – MINI-COURSE: 1 WEEK, 2 CREDITS
REGISTER @ EXPLORE COURSES

Investigating socioeconomic and ecological links
between human health and natural ecosystems

Two of the biggest challenges humanity has to face - promoting human health and halting environmental degradation – are too big to be addressed in an incremental, sector-specific way. Breakthroughs can be achieved through a creative, interdisciplinary approach that recognizes the complex links between human health and functioning ecosystems. Through lectures and case-study discussions with experts from multiple Stanford Schools and Departments, students will develop an in-depth understanding of the “Planetary Health” concept, its foundation, goals, priorities, and methods of investigation and will explore the most relevant immediate and long-term challenges.

Location: Campus Y2E2 300 + 1-day field trip to Hopkins Marine Station in Monterey
Instructors: Giulio De Leo, Katherine Burke, Susanne Sokolow, and Stephen Luby and invited speakers from Stanford University\

Grading
Pass/fail, based on student’s participation in discussion and class activity, home assignment, presentation

Target audience
Our primary target audience includes graduate students, professional students and post-docs from any Stanford school with a strong interest in integrating environmental sustainability, biology, engineering, medicine and global health. We are also willing to consider applications of strongly motivated undergraduate students.

Prerequisite
None. The course is specifically aimed to graduate and professional students from all Stanford schools. Enrollment preference is for graduate and professional students but postdocs and research staff are welcome to enroll on a space-available basis.
Interested undergraduate students should submit a letter of inquiry to cbutner@stanford.edu detailing their interest in attending the mini-course and the relevance of the topics addressed in the mini course for their current research activity and/or future career trajectory.