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Jun 1 2015 | Monterey County Weekly | Posted In: In the News
"A marine biologist who studied Monterey Bay’s tide pools and discovered some of the first evidence of warming ocean temperatures died on Thursday, May 28. Raphael (Rafe) Sagarin, 43, lost his life when a pickup truck struck him as he rode his bicycle in Tucson, Ariz." Click here to read the full...
May 28 2015 | Monterey County Weekly | Posted In: In the News
"Warmer surface waters mean less productivity at the bottom of the food chain, which hits hard at the top, from salmon to seals." Click here to read the full article.
May 22 2015 | NBC News | Posted In: In the News
"The sunlit upper layer of the world's oceans is teeming with tiny creatures that seem to have jumped off the pages of a Dr. Seuss tale, with exquisite see-through bodies, bulging eyes and an array of glowing colors. These mysterious sea characters may form the bulk of ocean life, new data from a...
May 12 2015 | Stanford Alumni | Posted In: In the News, Research Spotlight
"Like all Coleoid cephalopods, Humboldt squid (also known as jumbo squid) can change the color of their skin. Scientists have known the "how" of it—they employ organs called chromatophores—but little about why. Recent Stanford research offers new clues." Click here to read the full article.
May 7 2015 | Monterey Herald | Posted In: In the News
"Later this summer, PBS is joining with the BBC for an unprecedented broadcasting event — live coverage from Monterey, over three days, to highlight an incredible comeback story." Click to read the full article.
May 7 2015 | Stanford News | Posted In: In the News, Research Spotlight
"What has come as a surprise to scientists is the discovery of the unique underlying physiology that allows this manner of feeding: nerves that stretch like bungee cords. The discovery, made by biologists at Stanford and other universities, reveals a nerve construction unlike any other in the...
May 4 2015 | Stanford News | Posted In: In the News, Research Spotlight
"For millions of years, blue whales have cruised the world’s oceans with hardly a care, their sheer size making them largely free from predator attacks. The downside to being the largest animals in history, however, is that the species was never pressured to evolve defensive behaviors. Now, the...
Apr 30 2015 | Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment | Posted In: In the News, Research Spotlight
"A Stanford-led project to enlist freshwater prawns in the battle against a deadly disease recently entered the realm of big data." Click to read the full article.

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