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Nov 15 2016 | Posted In: In the News, Publications
Kelp forests support diverse and productive ecological communities throughout temperate and arctic regions worldwide, providing numerous ecosystem services to humans. Literature suggests that kelp forests are increasingly threatened by a variety of human impacts, including climate change,...
Nov 11 2016 | Posted In: Publications
The blue marlin (Makaira nigricans) is a highly migratory pelagic predator of tropical and subtropical seas. Information on the habitat use of marine species is fundamental to understanding their ecology and population dynamics and is needed to inform responsible management strategies. Using a long...
Nov 9 2016 | Posted In: In the News
Our former graduate student Katie Mach, Denny Lab 2010, is now part of the Woods Institute: "Stanford climate expert comments on opportunities and obstacles for advancing the Paris Agreement, an ambitious global climate pact that recently went into force."
Oct 30 2016 | Posted In: In the News
The decline of the dodo is a well-known tale: a large, slow-moving species was driven to extinction by human settlers on a remote island. The comparable plight of the coconut crab (Birgus latro)—the world’s largest land crab, which can weigh over 4 kg (8.8 lbs) and span nearly a meter (3 feet)...
Oct 27 2016 | Posted In: Publications
Environmental and social connectivity has a key role on the spread of schistosomiasis A coupled human-snail-larval system is applied in a connected environment Water contact patterns are estimated by coupling CDRs with hydrological information The implementation of a comprehensive approach is...
Oct 27 2016 | Posted In: Publications
Here, we give an overview of what has been learned so far by deploying tags on jellyfish, and why tagging is an appropriate method to study their behaviour and ecology. We then describe different tagging techniques, their advantages, disadvantages and challenges, and the steps to ensure future...
Oct 24 2016 | Posted In: In the News
Try to imagine what the world will look like if human-caused carbon-dioxide emissions aren’t curbed. If your imagination and scientific knowledge can’t take you there, virtual reality can. The Stanford Ocean Acidification Experience, a free science education tool (download here), can take you to...
Oct 24 2016 | Posted In: In the News, Publications
At a proximal level, the physiological impacts of global climate change on ectothermic organisms are manifest as changes in body temperatures. Especially for plants and animals exposed to direct solar radiation, body temperatures can be substantially different from air temperatures. We deployed...

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