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Jun 15 2017 | Posted In: In the News
A group of scientists, including Stanford professor Fiorrenza Micheli, has urged marine scientists to focus attention on human rights violations and other social issues in the seafood sector, in addition to advocating for sustainable practices.
Jun 12 2017 | Posted In: In the News
In 2016 the Stanford Catalyst for Collaborative Solutions launched a campus-wide effort to encourage new interdisciplinary research projects that would bring together scholars and practitioners from throughout Stanford’s seven schools and beyond to develop bold solutions to some of the world’s most...
Jun 6 2017 | Posted In: Publications
Nikki Traylor-Knowles, Noah H. Rose, Elizabeth A. Sheets, and Stephen R. Palumbi The Biological Bulletin May 31, 2017   https://doi.org/10.1086/692717 Abstract
Jun 1 2017 | Posted In: In the News, Publications
John N. Kittinger, Lydia C. L. Teh, Edward H. Allison, Nathan J. Bennett, Larry B. Crowder, Elena M. Finkbeiner, Christina Hicks, Cheryl G. Scarton, Katrina Nakamura, Yoshitaka Ota, Jhana Young, Aurora Alifano, Ashley Apel, Allison Arbib, Lori Bishop, Mariah Boyle, Andrés M. Cisneros-Montemayor,...
Jun 1 2017 | Posted In: In the News, Publications
Efforts in Australia had focussed largely on local issues, such as culling coral-munching crown-of-thorns starfish and improving water quality of nearby rivers. Such spending has to continue because "a dead coral can't survive climate change," Stephen Palumbi, director of Stanford University's...
May 30 2017 | Posted In: Publications
Petter H. Kvadsheima, Stacy DeRuiter, Lise D. Sivle, Jeremy Goldbogen, Rune Roland-Hansen, Patrick J.O. Miller, Frans-Peter A. Lam, John Calambokidis, Ari Friedlaender, Fleur Visser. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.marpolbul.2017.05.037
May 24 2017 | Posted In: Publications
Azzurra Bastari, Jacopo Beccacece, Francesco Ferretti, Fiorenza Micheli and Carlo Cerrano
May 23 2017 | Posted In: In the News
Whales are the largest animals on the planet, but they haven't always been giants. Fossil records show that ancient whales were much smaller than the currently living behemoths. So when did whales get so big, and how? . . .Follow NPR link to see more of the story or listen to the Morning Edition...

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