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Stanford scholars examine ecological underpinnings of rural poverty

 Pests and parasites compete with the poor and their livestock in rural economies. A new framework analyzes ecological, economic and epidemiological factors that can trap people in poverty. (Image credit: Upstream Alliance)


Pests and parasites compete with the poor and their livestock in rural economies. A new framework analyzes ecological, economic and epidemiological factors that can trap people in poverty.

Image credit: Upstream Alliance
Jul 14 2017

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In the News

By Rob Jordan

The “land of a thousand hills” today has one of the continent’s strongest economies and healthiest populations. This success story is borne out by a newly developed method for modeling rural poverty that could inform interventions to improve economies, health and ecosystems.

“The livelihoods of the rural poor are literally consumed by other organisms in complex ecological systems,” said co-author Matthew Bonds, a visiting assistant professor of medicine at Stanford. “The environment’s influence on poor rural economies makes them fundamentally different from the economies of more developed countries.”