Matthew Scott Savoca

Postdoctoral Scholar, Hopkins Marine Station
Doctor of Philosophy, University of California Davis (2017)
Bachelor of Science, Cornell University (2010)
Faculty Lab:
Matthew Scott Savoca

Publications

Savoca, M. S., Kühn, S., Sun, C. J., Avery-Gomm, S., Choy, C. A., Dudas, S., … Lynch, J. M. (2022). Towards a North Pacific Ocean long-term monitoring program for plastic pollution: A review and recommendations for plastic ingestion bioindicators. Environmental Pollution (Barking, Essex : 1987), 119861.
2022
Savoca, M. S., McInturf, A. G., & Hazen, E. L. (2021). Plastic ingestion by marine fish is widespread and increasing. Global Change Biology.
2021
Savoca, M. S., Czapanskiy, M. F., Kahane-Rapport, S. R., Gough, W. T., Fahlbusch, J. A., Bierlich, K. C., … Goldbogen, J. A. (2021). Baleen whale prey consumption based on high-resolution foraging measurements. Nature, 599(7883), 85–90.
2021
Savoca, M. S., Brodie, S., Welch, H., Hoover, A., Benaka, L. R., Bograd, S. J., & Hazen, E. L. (2020). Comprehensive bycatch assessment in US fisheries for prioritizing management. NATURE SUSTAINABILITY.
2020
Pfaller, J. B., Goforth, K. M., Gil, M. A., Savoca, M. S., & Lohmann, K. J. (2020). Odors from marine plastic debris elicit foraging behavior in sea turtles. Current Biology : CB, 30(5), R213–R214.
2020
Savoca, M. (2018). The ecology of an olfactory trap. Science (New York, N.Y.), 362(6417), 904.
2018
Savoca, M. S. (2018). Chemoattraction to dimethyl sulfide links the sulfur, iron, and carbon cycles in high-latitude oceans. BIOGEOCHEMISTRY, 138(1), 1–21.
2018
Savoca, M. S., Tyson, C. W., McGill, M., & Slager, C. J. (2017). Odours from marine plastic debris induce food search behaviours in a forage fish. PROCEEDINGS OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY B-BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES, 284(1860).
2017
Savoca, M. S., Wohlfeil, M. E., Ebeler, S. E., & Nevitt, G. A. (2016). Marine plastic debris emits a keystone infochemical for olfactory foraging seabirds. SCIENCE ADVANCES, 2(11), e1600395.
2016
Savoca, M. S., & Nevitt, G. A. (2014). Evidence that dimethyl sulfide facilitates a tritrophic mutualism between marine primary producers and top predators. PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, 111(11), 4157–61.
2014

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