Stephen Palumbi

Jane and Marshall Steel Jr. Professor of Marine Sciences and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment
Department:
Hopkins Marine Station
Stephen Palumbi
Steve has long been fascinated by how quickly the world around us changes. Work on the genomics of marine organisms tries to focus on basic evolutionary questions but also on practical solutions to questions about how to preserve and protect the diverse life in the sea. Steve has lectured extensively on human-induced evolutionary change, has used genetic detective work to identify whales, seahorses, rockfish and sharks for sale in retail markets, and is developing genomic methods to help find ocean species resistant to climate change. Work on corals in American Samoa and Palau has identified corals more resilient to heat stress. Work at the Hopkins Marine Station focuses on how kelp, sea urchins, abalone and mussels respond to short term environmental changes and to environmental shifts over small spatial scales.

Steve’s latest book for non-scientists is about the amazing species in the sea, written with Steve’s son and novelist Anthony. The Extreme Life of the Sea tells about the fastest species in the sea, and hottest, coldest, oldest etc. Steve's previous book, The Death and Life of Monterey Bay: A Story of Revival, written with Carolyn Sotka, brought to life the unusual environmental success story of the recovery of Monterey Bay. Steve's first science book for non-scientists The Evolution Explosion explored how human accelerate evolutionary change in the species around us. Steve helped write, research and also appears in the BBC series The Future is Wild and the History Channel's World Without People. Other recent films appearances include The End of the Line, and the Canadian Broadcasting series One Ocean. Major work continues on the microdocumentary project, the Short Attention Span Science Theater. Steve's band Sustainable Soul has several songs out, including Crab Love and The Last Fish Left.

Publications

Teixidó, N., Caroselli, E., Alliouane, S., Ceccarelli, C., Comeau, S., Gattuso, J.-P. P., … Gambi, M. C. (2020). Ocean acidification causes variable trait shifts in a coral species. Global Change Biology.
2020
Wilder, A. P., Palumbi, S. R., Conover, D. O., & Therkildsen, N. O. (2020). Footprints of local adaptation span hundreds of linked genes in the Atlantic silverside genome. Evolution Letters, 4(5), 430–43.
2020
Shum, P., Barney, B. T., O'Leary, J. K., & Palumbi, S. R. (2019). Cobble community DNA as a tool to monitor patterns of biodiversity within kelp forest ecosystems. Molecular Ecology Resources.
2019
Therkildsen, N. O., Wilder, A. P., Conover, D. O., Munch, S. B., Baumann, H., & Palumbi, S. R. (2019). Contrasting genomic shifts underlie parallel phenotypic evolution in response to fishing. Science (New York, N.Y.), 365(6452), 487–90.
2019
Bay, R. A., & Palumbi, S. R. (2015). Rapid Acclimation Ability Mediated by Transcriptome Changes in Reef-Building Corals. Genome Biology and Evolution, 7(6), 1602–12.
2015
Armbrust, E. V., & Palumbi, S. R. (2015). Marine biology. Uncovering hidden worlds of ocean biodiversity. Science , 348(6237), 865–67.
2015
McCauley, D. J., Pinsky, M. L., Palumbi, S. R., Estes, J. A., Joyce, F. H., & Warner, R. R. (2015). Marine defaunation: animal loss in the global ocean. Science , 347(6219).
2015
Bay, R. A., & Palumbi, S. R. (2014). Multilocus Adaptation Associated with Heat Resistance in Reef-Building Corals. CURRENT BIOLOGY, 24(24).
2014
Palumbi, S. R., Barshis, D. J., Traylor-Knowles, N., & Bay, R. A. (2014). Mechanisms of reef coral resistance to future climate change. Science , 344(6186), 895–98.
2014
De Wit, P., Rogers-Bennett, L., Kudela, R. M., & Palumbi, S. R. (2014). Forensic genomics as a novel tool for identifying the causes of mass mortality events. Nature Communications, 5, 3652-?
2014

Contact

Telephone
(831) 655-6210