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Research * Technology * Conservation * Diversity

Winter quarter applications are due November 15.

The slate of courses fills many different degree requirements.

Course offerings for:

Winter    Spring    Summer    Autumn

Winter Courses

BIOHOPK 155H: Developmental Biology and EvolutionBIOHOPK 155H: Developmental Biology and EvolutionBIOHOPK 161H: Invertebrate ZoologyBIOHOPK 161H: Invertebrate ZoologyBIOHOPK 163H: Oceanic BiologyBIOHOPK 163H: Oceanic BiologyBIOHOPK 172H: Marine EcologyBIOHOPK 172H: Marine EcologyBIOHOPK 174H: Experimental Design & ProbabilityBIOHOPK 174H: Experimental Design & ProbabilityBIOHOPK 177H: Dynamics and Management of Marine PopulationsBIOHOPK 177H: Dynamics and Management of Marine PopulationsBIOHOPK 179H: Physiological Ecology of Marine MegafaunaBIOHOPK 179H: Physiological Ecology of Marine MegafaunaBIOHOPK 187H: Sensory EcologyBIOHOPK 187H: Sensory EcologyBIOHOPK 199H: Undergraduate ResearchBIOHOPK 199H: Undergraduate ResearchPrevious Slide 1/9 Next

Faculty Research

drone over bluewhale

Studying cetacean behaviour: new technological approaches and conservation applications

Science Direct 

Student Research

From spore to plate — Exploring California’s wild, edible mushrooms by Isabel Jones

From spore to plate — Exploring California’s wild, edible mushrooms by Isabel Jones

peninsula|press

Current News

Floating Pluteus

Sea Urchins Pull Themselves Inside Out to be Reborn

KQED

Upcoming Events

Sep
23

SEMINAR: noon-1pm Boat Works, Melanie Abeccassis, NOAA Pacific Island Fisheries Science Center, Honolulu, Why do animals go where they go?

 

Sep
30

SEMINAR: noon-1pm Boat Works, Ed Green, University of California, Santa Cruz

 

Oct
7

SEMINAR: noon-1pm Boat Works, Thomas E. Juenger, University of TX, Austin, Genetic and genomic studies of ecotype formation and local adaptation in Panicum grasses

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Research Spotlight:

Patiria miniata - bat star
Patiria miniata - bat star

Lowe Lab

The first animals were marine invertebrates: tiny, spineless organisms from which all modern fauna evolved. Through a largely unknown series of evolutionary accidents and adaptations, those marine invertebrates became a multitude of new species with body plans and developmental processes different from those of their predecessors.
more . . .