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Research * Technology * Conservation * Diversity

A Summer Internship spent at Hopkins is a great way to find your path into marine biology.

For the rest of the year, the slate of courses fills many different degree requirements.

Course offerings for:

Autumn   Winter   Spring    Summer 

Summer Opportunities

BIOHOPK 185H Ecology & Conservation of Kelp Forest CommunitiesBIOHOPK 185H Ecology & Conservation of Kelp Forest CommunitiesBecoming a Stanford Marine BiologistBecoming a Stanford Marine BiologistBecoming a Stanford Marine BiologistBecoming a Stanford Marine BiologistBecoming a Stanford Marine BiologistBecoming a Stanford Marine BiologistBecoming a Stanford Marine BiologistBecoming a Stanford Marine BiologistBecoming a Stanford Marine BiologistBecoming a Stanford Marine BiologistBecoming a Stanford Marine BiologistBecoming a Stanford Marine BiologistBecoming a Stanford Marine BiologistBecoming a Stanford Marine BiologistBecoming a Stanford Marine BiologistBecoming a Stanford Marine BiologistBecoming a Stanford Marine BiologistBecoming a Stanford Marine BiologistPrevious Slide 1/10 Next

Faculty Research

Steve Palumbi

Director Steve Palumbi elected to the National Academy of Sciences

NAS    Stanford News

Student Research

Juhyung Lee on kayak

Seagrass ecosystem health in a high CO2 ocean

Juhyung Lee

Current News

Monterey Bay squid season basically a bust

Monterey Bay squid season basically a bust

Monterey County Herald

Upcoming Events

May
27

SEMINAR: noon-1pm Boat Works, Peter T. Madsen, Aarhus University, 22nd Annual Lawrence R. Blinks Memorial Lecture, Toothed whale biosonar in the wild: An echoic search for prey in a world of darkness

Jun
3

SEMINAR: noon-1pm Boat Works, Jody Beers, Hopkins Marine Station, Stanford University, Integrative Physiology in the Anthropocene: Examples from the California Coast

more . . .

Seminars start up again in the Fall

Research Spotlight:

A Humboldt squid in a tank at our field lab in Santa Rosalía (Photo credit: Patrick Daniel).
A Humboldt squid in a tank at
our field lab in Santa Rosalía

Gilly Lab

Dosidicus gigas, or the Humboldt squid, is something of a mystery. A native of the Humboldt Current off the western coast of South America, the squid is locally called diablo rojo, or “red devil,” after its color-changing skin that flashes red when it hunts. But the squid’s skin isn’t its only fickle feature: its size, habitat, and distribution can be equally unpredictable.
more . . .