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Courses

Course Quarter: Autumn


BIO 3

Frontiers in Marine Biology

An introduction to contemporary research in marine biology, including ecology, conservation biology, environmental toxicology, behavior, biomechanics, evolution, neurobiology, and molecular biology. Emphasis is on new discoveries and the technologies used to make them. Weekly lectures by faculty from the Hopkins Marine Station.


Area(s):

Level: Undergraduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses

BIO 12N

Sensory Ecology of Marine Animals

Animals living in the oceans experience a highly varied range of environmental stimuli. An aquatic lifestyle requires an equally rich range of sensory adaptations, including some that are totally foreign to us. In this course we will examine sensory system in marine animals from both an environmental and behavioral perspective and from the point of view of neuroscience and information systems engineering.


Area(s):
Requirements: WAY-SMA
Level: Undergraduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses

BIOHOPK 198H

Directed Instruction or Reading

May be taken as a prelude to research and may also involve participation in a lab or research group seminar and/or library research. Credit for work arranged with out-of-department instructors restricted to Biology majors and requires department approval. May be repeated for credit. (Staff)


Area(s): Interaction (Ecology & Conservation)

Level: Undergraduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses



















































BIOHOPK 199H

Undergraduate Research

BIOHOPK 199H

Undergraduate Research

Qualified undergraduates undertake individual work in the fields listed under 300H. Arrangements must be made by consultation or correspondence.


Area(s):

Level: Undergraduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses



















































BIOHOPK 315H

Career Development for Graduate Students

The course will cover multiple skills required to succeed in graduate school and beyond, including fund raising, publishing, selecting career options, job application and negotiation, and teaching, through lectures, group discussions, and practical excercises.


Area(s):

Level: Graduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses

Course Quarter: Winter


BIOHOPK 155H

Developmental Biology and Evolution (BIOHOPK 255H)

(Graduate students register for 255) This course focusses on how animals form their basic body plans; from the formation of their germ layers; ectoderm, endoderm and mesoderm, to how they are organized along the main developmental axes; the anteroposterior and dorsoventral axes. The course will focus in part on the molecular mechanisms that underlie these developmental decisions from work carried out in established developmental model species. However, we will also explore the current understanding of how these mechanisms evolved from new insights from emerging models representing a broad range of animal phyla. The setting at Hopkins Marine Station will allow us to carry out experiments from animals collected in the field, and the course will involve a substantial lab component to complement concepts and approaches presented in lecture. nPre-requisites : Biocore or by permission of instructor


Area(s): Change (Development & Evolution)
Requirements: WAY-SMA
Level: Undergraduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses

BIOHOPK 161H

Invertebrate Zoology (BIOHOPK 261H)

(Graduate students register for 261H.) Survey of invertebrate diversity emphasizing form and function in a phylogenetic framework. Morphological diversity, life histories, physiology, and ecology of the major invertebrate groups, concentrating on local marine forms as examples. Current views on the phylogenetic relationships and evolution of the invertebrates. Lectures, lab, plus field trips. Satisfies Central Menu Area 3 for Bio majors. Prerequisite: Biology core or consent of instructor.


Area(s): Interaction (Ecology & Conservation)
Requirements: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA
Level: Undergraduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses

BIOHOPK 163H

Oceanic Biology (BIOHOPK 263H)

(Graduate students register for 263H.) In this course we expore how the physics and chemistry of the oceanic environment affect marine plants and animals. Topics include: seawater and ocean circulation, separation of light and nutrients in the two-layered ocean, oceanic food webs and trophic interactions, oceanic environments, biogeography, and global change. Lectures, discussion, and field trips. Satisfies Central Menu Area 4 for Bio majors, and fulfulls requirements in the Earth Systems Oceans & Climate Track and the Coastal Track of Envirnmental Systems Engineering. The course is open to all students, although PHYSICS 21 or 51, CHEM 31, and the Biology core provide useful background


Area(s): Function (Physiology & Biomechanics), Interaction (Ecology & Conservation)
Requirements: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA
Level: Undergraduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses

BIOHOPK 172H

Marine Ecology: From Organisms to Ecosystems (BIOHOPK 272H)

(Graduate students register for 272H.) This course incorporates the approaches of experimental ecology, biomechanics (ecomechanics), and physiology to develop an integrated perspective on the factors that govern the structures of marine ecosystems and how environment change, including anthropogenic influences, affects ecosystems' species composition and health. Focus is on rocky intertidal, kelp forest, estuarine, and midwater ecosystems of Monterey Bay. Experimental projects done in the field offer experience in a variety of ecological techniques and in analysis of ecological data. Students will engage in presentation and debates of current topics in marine ecology and conservation. Satisfies Central Menu Area 4 for Bio majors. Prerequisite: Biology core or consent of instructor. Fulfills WIM in Biology.


Area(s): Interaction (Ecology & Conservation)
Requirements: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA
Level: Undergraduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses

BIOHOPK 174H

Experimental Design and Probability (BIOHOPK 274H)

(Graduate students register for 274H.) Variability is an integral part of biology. Introduction to probability and its use in designing experiments to address biological problems. Focus is on analysis of variance, when and how to use it, why it works, and how to interpret the results. Design of complex, but practical, asymmetrical experiments and environmental impact studies, and regression and analysis of covariance. Computer-based data analysis. Prerequisite: Biology core or consent of instructor.


Area(s): Interaction (Ecology & Conservation)
Requirements: GER: DB-NatSci, GER:DB-Math, WAY-AQR, WAY-FR
Level: Undergraduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses


BIOHOPK 177H

Dynamics and Management of Marine Populations (BIOHOPK 277H)

(Graduate students register for 277H.) Course examines the ecological factors and processes that control natural and harvested marine populations. Course emphasizes mathematical models as tools to assess the dynamics of populations and to derive projections of their demographic fate under different management scenarios. Course objectives will be met by a combination of theoretical lectures, assigned readings and class discussions, case study analysis and interactive computer sessions.


Area(s): Interaction (Ecology & Conservation)
Requirements: WAY-AQR, WAY-FR
Level: Undergraduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses

BIOHOPK 187H

Sensory Ecology (BIOHOPK 287H)

(Graduate students register for 287H.) Topics: the ways animals receive, filter, and process information gleaned from the environment, sensory receptor mechanisms, neural processing, specialization to life underwater, communication within and between species, importance of behavior to ecosystem structure and dynamics, impact of acoustic and light pollution on marine animals. Emphasis is on the current scientific literature. The laboratory portion of the class explores sensory mechanisms using neurobiological methods and methods of experimental animal behavior.


Area(s): Interaction (Ecology & Conservation)
Requirements: WAY-SMA
Level: Undergraduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses

BIOHOPK 198H

Directed Instruction or Reading

May be taken as a prelude to research and may also involve participation in a lab or research group seminar and/or library research. Credit for work arranged with out-of-department instructors restricted to Biology majors and requires department approval. May be repeated for credit. (Staff)


Area(s): Interaction (Ecology & Conservation)

Level: Undergraduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses



















































BIOHOPK 199H

Undergraduate Research

BIOHOPK 199H

Undergraduate Research

Qualified undergraduates undertake individual work in the fields listed under 300H. Arrangements must be made by consultation or correspondence.


Area(s):

Level: Undergraduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses



















































BIOHOPK 255H

Developmental Biology and Evolution (BIOHOPK 155H)

(Graduate students register for 255) This course focusses on how animals form their basic body plans; from the formation of their germ layers; ectoderm, endoderm and mesoderm, to how they are organized along the main developmental axes; the anteroposterior and dorsoventral axes. The course will focus in part on the molecular mechanisms that underlie these developmental decisions from work carried out in established developmental model species. However, we will also explore the current understanding of how these mechanisms evolved from new insights from emerging models representing a broad range of animal phyla. The setting at Hopkins Marine Station will allow us to carry out experiments from animals collected in the field, and the course will involve a substantial lab component to complement concepts and approaches presented in lecture. nPre-requisites : Biocore or by permission of instructor


Area(s):

Level: Graduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses

BIOHOPK 261H

Invertebrate Zoology (BIOHOPK 161H)

(Graduate students register for 261H.) Survey of invertebrate diversity emphasizing form and function in a phylogenetic framework. Morphological diversity, life histories, physiology, and ecology of the major invertebrate groups, concentrating on local marine forms as examples. Current views on the phylogenetic relationships and evolution of the invertebrates. Lectures, lab, plus field trips. Satisfies Central Menu Area 3 for Bio majors. Prerequisite: Biology core or consent of instructor.


Area(s): Change (Development & Evolution)

Level: Graduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses

BIOHOPK 263H

Oceanic Biology (BIOHOPK 163H)

(Graduate students register for 263H.) How the physics and chemistry of the oceanic environment affect marine plants and animals. Topics: seawater and ocean circulation, separation of light and nutrients in the two-layered ocean, oceanic food webs and trophic interactions, oceanic environments, biogeography, and global change. Lectures, discussion, and field trips. Satisfies Central Menu Area 4 for Bio majors. Recommended: PHYSICS 21 or 51, CHEM 31, Biology core, or consent of instructor.


Area(s):

Level: Graduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses

BIOHOPK 272H

Marine Ecology: From Organisms to Ecosystems (BIOHOPK 172H)

(Graduate students register for 272H.) This course incorporates the approaches of experimental ecology, biomechanics (ecomechanics), and physiology to develop an integrated perspective on the factors that govern the structures of marine ecosystems and how environment change, including anthropogenic influences, affects ecosystems' species composition and health. Focus is on rocky intertidal, kelp forest, estuarine, and midwater ecosystems of Monterey Bay. Experimental projects done in the field offer experience in a variety of ecological techniques and in analysis of ecological data. Students will engage in presentation and debates of current topics in marine ecology and conservation. Satisfies Central Menu Area 4 for Bio majors. Prerequisite: Biology core or consent of instructor. Fulfills WIM in Biology.


Area(s): Interaction (Ecology & Conservation)

Level: Graduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses

BIOHOPK 274H

Experimental Design and Probability (BIOHOPK 174H)

(Graduate students register for 274H.) Variability is an integral part of biology. Introduction to probability and its use in designing experiments to address biological problems. Focus is on analysis of variance, when and how to use it, why it works, and how to interpret the results. Design of complex, but practical, asymmetrical experiments and environmental impact studies, and regression and analysis of covariance. Computer-based data analysis. Prerequisite: Biology core or consent of instructor.


Area(s):

Level: Graduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses


BIOHOPK 277H

Dynamics and Management of Marine Populations (BIOHOPK 177H)

(Graduate students register for 277H.) Course examines the ecological factors and processes that control natural and harvested marine populations. Course emphasizes mathematical models as tools to assess the dynamics of populations and to derive projections of their demographic fate under different management scenarios. Course objectives will be met by a combination of theoretical lectures, assigned readings and class discussions, case study analysis and interactive computer sessions.


Area(s): Interaction (Ecology & Conservation)

Level: Graduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses

BIOHOPK 287H

Sensory Ecology (BIOHOPK 187H)

(Graduate students register for 287H.) Topics: the ways animals receive, filter, and process information gleaned from the environment, sensory receptor mechanisms, neural processing, specialization to life underwater, communication within and between species, importance of behavior to ecosystem structure and dynamics, impact of acoustic and light pollution on marine animals. Emphasis is on the current scientific literature. The laboratory portion of the class explores sensory mechanisms using neurobiological methods and methods of experimental animal behavior.


Area(s): Interaction (Ecology & Conservation)

Level: Graduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses

BIOHOPK 290H

Teaching of Biological Science

Open to upper-division undergraduates and graduate students. Practical experience in teaching lab biology or serving as an assistant in a lecture course. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.nn (Staff)


Area(s):

Level: Graduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses




































BIOHOPK 330H

Scientific Writing

BIOHOPK 330H

Scientific Writing

This writer's seminar will workshop the elements of good scientific writing by focusing on a paper's Introduction. We will chart the elements of an effective Introduction, designed for different audiences and types of scientific journals. The course will provide participants with the chance to craft an Introduction to a current paper or proposal and have it evaluated in light of the ideal structure we define.


Area(s):

Level: Graduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses

Course Quarter: Spring


BIO 3N

Views of a Changing Sea: Literature & Science

The state of a changing world ocean, particularly in the eastern Pacific, will be examined through historical and contemporary fiction, non-fiction and scientific publications. Issues will include harvest and mariculture fisheries, land-sea interactions and oceanic climate change in both surface and deep waters.


Area(s):
Requirements: GER: DB-NatSci
Level: Undergraduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses

BIOHOPK 43

Plant Biology, Evolution, and Ecology

Introduction to biology in a marine context. Principles of plant biology: physiology, structure, diversity. Principles of evolution: macro and microevolution, population genetics. Ecology: the principles governing the distribution and abundance of organisms; population, community, and ecosystem ecology. Equivalent to BIO 43. Corequisite: BIOHOPK 47.


Area(s): Function (Physiology & Biomechanics), Change (Development & Evolution), Interaction (Ecology & Conservation)
Requirements: GER: DB-NatSci
Level: Undergraduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses

BIOHOPK 47

Core Laboratory in Plant Biology, Ecology and Evolution

Laboratory and field projects provide working familiarity with the concepts, organisms, and techniques of plant and evolutionary biology, and ecology. Emphasis is on hands-on experimentation in the marine environment, analysis of data, and written and oral presentation of the experiments. Equivalent to BIO 44Y. Corequisite: BIOHOPK 43. Satisfies WIM in Biology.


Area(s): Function (Physiology & Biomechanics), Change (Development & Evolution), Interaction (Ecology & Conservation)
Requirements: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA
Level: Undergraduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses

BIOHOPK 150H

Ecological Mechanics (BIOHOPK 250H)

(Graduate students register for 250H.) The principles of life's physical interactions. We will explore basic physics. fluid mechanics, thermal dynamics, and materials science to see how the principles of these fields can be used to investigate ecology at levels from the individual to the community. Topics include: diffusion, boundary layers, fluid-dynamic forces, locomotion, heat-budget models, fracture mechanics, adhesion, beam theory, the statistics of extremes, and the theory of self-organization. Open to students from all backgrounds. Some familiarity with basic physics and calculus is advantageous but not necessary.


Area(s): Function (Physiology & Biomechanics), Interaction (Ecology & Conservation)
Requirements: WAY-SMA
Level: Undergraduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses

BIOHOPK 156H

Hands-On Neurobiology: Structure, Function and Development (BIOHOPK 256H)

This laboratory course will examine neural and neuromuscular systems at a cellular level in selected vertebrate and invertebrate taxa using anatomical, physiological and molecular approaches. Intracellular dye injections and confocal microscopy will be used to visualize neuronal structure. Ca-imaging will permit functional analysis of living neurons. Electrical recording methods will be used to explore principles of excitability, synaptic transmission, sensory pathways and neural integration. Development of neural systems will be studied using molecular visualization methods. Work in the lab will be supplemented with informal lectures and discussions, and results of the labs will be reviewed weekly. Two 4-hour afternoon lab sessions per week


Area(s): Change (Development & Evolution)

Level: Undergraduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses

BIOHOPK 168H

Disease Ecology: from parasites evolution to the socio-economic impacts of pathogens on nations (BIOHOPK 268H)

(Graduate students register for 268H.) Course will lead participants on a journey through the dynamics of infectious diseases that will start at the smallest level from within-host parasite dynamics and will progressively scale up to parasite evolution, disease ecology, public health policies, disease driven poverty traps and the socio-economic impact of infectious diseases on nations. The course will be organized around case studies, including among the others, schistosomiasis, malaria, cholera and sleeping sickness. Participants will have the opportunity to develop a capstone project.


Area(s): Interaction (Ecology & Conservation)

Level: Undergraduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses

BIOHOPK 173H

Marine Conservation Biology (BIOHOPK 273H)

(Graduate students register for 273H.). Introduction to the key concepts of ecology and policy relevant to marine conservation issues at the population to ecosystems level. Focus on the origin and maintenance of biodiversity and conservation applications from both the biology and policy perspectives (for example, endangered species, captive breeding, reserve design, habitat fragmentation, ecosystem restoration/rehabilitation). Also includes emerging approaches such as ecosystem based management, ocean planning, and coupled social-ecological systems. The course will include lectures, readings and discussions of primary literature, and attendance at seminars with visiting scholars. Prerequisite: introductory biology; suggested: a policy and/or introductory ecology course.


Area(s): Interaction (Ecology & Conservation)

Level: Undergraduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses

BIOHOPK 174H

Experimental Design and Probability (BIOHOPK 274H)

(Graduate students register for 274H.) Variability is an integral part of biology. Introduction to probability and its use in designing experiments to address biological problems. Focus is on analysis of variance, when and how to use it, why it works, and how to interpret the results. Design of complex, but practical, asymmetrical experiments and environmental impact studies, and regression and analysis of covariance. Computer-based data analysis. Prerequisite: Biology core or consent of instructor.


Area(s): Interaction (Ecology & Conservation)
Requirements: GER: DB-NatSci, GER:DB-Math, WAY-AQR, WAY-FR
Level: Undergraduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses


BIOHOPK 179H

Physiological Ecology of Marine Megafauna (BIOHOPK 279H)

(Graduate students register for 279H.) The ocean is home to the largest animals of all-time. How, when, and why did gigantism evolve in different taxa? What are the consequences of large body size? This course will focus on how biological processes scale with body size, with an emphasis on oceanic megafauna including marine mammals, birds, fishes, and reptiles. In particular, the course will explore the functional mechanisms that generate the scaling relationships for physiological and ecological traits, such as metabolism, ecosystem function and body size evolution. Students will also be introduced to state-of-the-art technologies used to student marine megafauna in some of the most logistically challenging habitats on earth.


Area(s): Interaction (Ecology & Conservation)
Requirements: WAY-SMA
Level: Undergraduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses

BIOHOPK 181H

Physiology of Global Change (BIOHOPK 281H)

(Graduate students register for 281H.) Global change is leading to significant alterations in several environmental factors, including temperature, ocean acidity and oxygen availability. This course focuses on: (i) how these environmental changes lead to physiological stress and (ii) how, and to what extent, are organisms able to adapt through short-term acclimatization and evolutionary adaptation to cope with these stresses. A major focus of the class is to link changes in species' distribution patterns with underlying physiological mechanics that establish environmental optima and tolerance limits.


Area(s): Interaction (Ecology & Conservation)
Requirements: WAY-SMA
Level: Undergraduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses

BIOHOPK 182H

Stanford at Sea (BIOHOPK 323H, EARTHSYS 323, ESS 323)

(Graduate students register for 323H.) Five weeks of marine science including oceanography, marine physiology, policy, maritime studies, conservation, and nautical science at Hopkins Marine Station, followed by five weeks at sea aboard a sailing research vessel in the Pacific Ocean. Shore component comprised of three multidisciplinary courses meeting daily and continuing aboard ship. Students develop an independent research project plan while ashore, and carry out the research at sea. In collaboration with the Sea Education Association of Woods Hole, MA. Only 6 units may count towards the Biology major.


Area(s): Interaction (Ecology & Conservation)
Requirements: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA
Level: Undergraduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses
Course Website: Stanford@SEA website

BIOHOPK 198H

Directed Instruction or Reading

May be taken as a prelude to research and may also involve participation in a lab or research group seminar and/or library research. Credit for work arranged with out-of-department instructors restricted to Biology majors and requires department approval. May be repeated for credit. (Staff)


Area(s): Interaction (Ecology & Conservation)

Level: Undergraduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses



















































BIOHOPK 199H

Undergraduate Research

BIOHOPK 199H

Undergraduate Research

Qualified undergraduates undertake individual work in the fields listed under 300H. Arrangements must be made by consultation or correspondence.


Area(s):

Level: Undergraduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses



















































BIOHOPK 234H

Topics in Comparative and Environmental Physiology

Seminar and discussion focused on current topics and research at the interface of physiology and ecology


Area(s): Function (Physiology & Biomechanics)

Level: Graduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses

BIOHOPK 250H

Ecological Mechanics (BIOHOPK 150H)

(Graduate students register for 250H.) The principles of life's physical interactions. We will explore basic physics. fluid mechanics, thermal dynamics, and materials science to see how the principles of these fields can be used to investigate ecology at levels from the individual to the community. Topics include: diffusion, boundary layers, fluid-dynamic forces, locomotion, heat-budget models, fracture mechanics, adhesion, beam theory, the statistics of extremes, and the theory of self-organization. Open to students from all backgrounds. Some familiarity with basic physics and calculus advantageous but not necessary.


Area(s):

Level: Graduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses

BIOHOPK 256H

Hands-On Neurobiology: Structure, Function and Development (BIOHOPK 156H)

This laboratory course will examine neural and neuromuscular systems at a cellular level in selected vertebrate and invertebrate taxa using anatomical, physiological and molecular approaches. Intracellular dye injections and confocal microscopy will be used to visualize neuronal structure. Ca-imaging will permit functional analysis of living neurons. Electrical recording methods will be used to explore principles of excitability, synaptic transmission, sensory pathways and neural integration. Development of neural systems will be studied using molecular visualization methods. Work in the lab will be supplemented with informal lectures and discussions, and results of the labs will be reviewed weekly. Two 4-hour afternoon lab sessions per week


Area(s): Change (Development & Evolution)

Level: Graduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses

BIOHOPK 268H

Disease Ecology: from parasites evolution to the socio-economic impacts of pathogens on nations (BIOHOPK 168H)

(Graduate students register for 268H.) Course will lead participants on a journey through the dynamics of infectious diseases that will start at the smallest level from within-host parasite dynamics and will progressively scale up to parasite evolution, disease ecology, public health policies, disease driven poverty traps and the socio-economic impact of infectious diseases on nations. The course will be organized around case studies, including among the others, schistosomiasis, malaria, cholera and sleeping sickness. Participants will have the opportunity to develop a capstone project.


Area(s):

Level: Graduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses

BIOHOPK 273H

Marine Conservation Biology (BIOHOPK 173H)

(Graduate students register for 273H.). Introduction to the key concepts of ecology and policy relevant to marine conservation issues at the population to ecosystems level. Focus on the origin and maintenance of biodiversity and conservation applications from both the biology and policy perspectives (for example, endangered species, captive breeding, reserve design, habitat fragmentation, ecosystem restoration/rehabilitation). Also includes emerging approaches such as ecosystem based management, ocean planning, and coupled social-ecological systems. The course will include lectures, readings and discussions of primary literature, and attendance at seminars with visiting scholars. Prerequisite: introductory biology; suggested: a policy and/or introductory ecology course.


Area(s): Interaction (Ecology & Conservation)

Level: Graduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses

BIOHOPK 274H

Experimental Design and Probability (BIOHOPK 174H)

(Graduate students register for 274H.) Variability is an integral part of biology. Introduction to probability and its use in designing experiments to address biological problems. Focus is on analysis of variance, when and how to use it, why it works, and how to interpret the results. Design of complex, but practical, asymmetrical experiments and environmental impact studies, and regression and analysis of covariance. Computer-based data analysis. Prerequisite: Biology core or consent of instructor.


Area(s):

Level: Graduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses


BIOHOPK 279H

Physiological Ecology of Marine Megafauna (BIOHOPK 179H)

(Graduate students register for 279H.) The ocean is home to the largest animals of all-time. How, when, and why did gigantism evolve in different taxa? What are the consequences of large body size? This course will focus on how biological processes scale with body size, with an emphasis on oceanic megafauna including marine mammals, birds, fishes, and reptiles. In particular, the course will explore the functional mechanisms that generate the scaling relationships for physiological and ecological traits, such as metabolism, ecosystem function and body size evolution. Students will also be introduced to state-of-the-art technologies used to student marine megafauna in some of the most logistically challenging habitats on earth.


Area(s): Function (Physiology & Biomechanics)

Level: Graduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses

BIOHOPK 281H

Physiology of Global Change (BIOHOPK 181H)

(Graduate students register for 281H.) Global change is leading to significant alterations in several environmental factors, including temperature, ocean acidity and oxygen availability. This course focuses on: (i) how these environmental changes lead to physiological stress and (ii) how, and to what extent, are organisms able to adapt through short-term acclimatization and evolutionary adaptation to cope with these stresses. A major focus of the class is to link changes in species' distribution patterns with underlying physiological mechanics that establish environmental optima and tolerance limits.


Area(s): Interaction (Ecology & Conservation)

Level: Graduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses

BIOHOPK 290H

Teaching of Biological Science

Open to upper-division undergraduates and graduate students. Practical experience in teaching lab biology or serving as an assistant in a lecture course. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.nn (Staff)


Area(s):

Level: Graduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses




































BIOHOPK 323H

Stanford at Sea (BIOHOPK 182H, EARTHSYS 323, ESS 323)

(Graduate students register for 323H.) Five weeks of marine science including oceanography, marine physiology, policy, maritime studies, conservation, and nautical science at Hopkins Marine Station, followed by five weeks at sea aboard a sailing research vessel in the Pacific Ocean. Shore component comprised of three multidisciplinary courses meeting daily and continuing aboard ship. Students develop an independent research project plan while ashore, and carry out the research at sea. In collaboration with the Sea Education Association of Woods Hole, MA. Only 6 units may count towards the Biology major.


Area(s): Interaction (Ecology & Conservation)

Level: Graduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses
Course Website: Stanford@SEA website

Course Quarter: Summer


BIOHOPK 185H

Ecology and Conservation of Kelp Forest Communities (BIOHOPK 285H)

(Graduate students register for 285H.) Five week course. Daily lectures, labs, and scuba dives focused on kelp forest biology. Topics include identification and natural history of resident organisms, ecological processes that maintain biodiversity and community organization, field methods, data analysis, and research diving techniques. Class projects contribute to ongoing studies associated with Hopkins Marine Life Observatory. It is recommended that students complete one of Stanford's Scientific Diver Training sessions, offered during spring break and the week before the course starts, although this is not a requirement. Prerequisites: consent of instructor; advanced scuba certification and scuba equipment.


Area(s): Interaction (Ecology & Conservation)
Requirements: WAY-SMA
Level: Undergraduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses

BIOHOPK 198H

Directed Instruction or Reading

May be taken as a prelude to research and may also involve participation in a lab or research group seminar and/or library research. Credit for work arranged with out-of-department instructors restricted to Biology majors and requires department approval. May be repeated for credit. (Staff)


Area(s): Interaction (Ecology & Conservation)

Level: Undergraduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses



















































BIOHOPK 199H

Undergraduate Research

BIOHOPK 199H

Undergraduate Research

Qualified undergraduates undertake individual work in the fields listed under 300H. Arrangements must be made by consultation or correspondence.


Area(s):

Level: Undergraduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses



















































BIOHOPK 274

Hopkins Microbiology Course (BIO 274S, CEE 274S, ESS 253S)

(Formerly GES 274S.) Four-week, intensive. The interplay between molecular, physiological, ecological, evolutionary, and geochemical processes that constitute, cause, and maintain microbial diversity. How to isolate key microorganisms driving marine biological and geochemical diversity, interpret culture-independent molecular characterization of microbial species, and predict causes and consequences. Laboratory component: what constitutes physiological and metabolic microbial diversity; how evolutionary and ecological processes diversify individual cells into physiologically heterogeneous populations; and the principles of interactions between individuals, their population, and other biological entities in a dynamically changing microbial ecosystem. Prerequisites: CEE 274A and CEE 274B, or equivalents.


Area(s): Interaction (Ecology & Conservation)

Level: Graduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses

BIOHOPK 280

Short Course on Ocean Policy

The course will introduce graduate students in the natural and social sciences to ocean policy and governance in the US at national, regional, state, and local levels. Together with leaders in ocean science and policy, students will examine pressing issues in ocean sustainability from natural science, social science, and legal and policy perspectives, with an emphasis on the role of science in the policy and governance processes. Students will learn and apply practical skills in communication, leadership and interdisciplinary problem-solving through participation in a group project, interactive discussions and simulations, and field trips. Prerequisite: consent of instructor and by application due in winter.


Area(s):

Level: Graduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses

BIOHOPK 285H

Ecology and Conservation of Kelp Forest Communities (BIOHOPK 185H)

(Graduate students register for 285H.) Five week course. Daily lectures, labs, and scuba dives focused on kelp forest biology. Topics include identification and natural history of resident organisms, ecological processes that maintain biodiversity and community organization, field methods, data analysis, and research diving techniques. Class projects contribute to ongoing studies associated with Hopkins Marine Life Observatory. It is recommended that students complete one of Stanford's Scientific Diver Training sessions, offered during spring break and the week before the course starts, although this is not a requirement. Prerequisites: consent of instructor; advanced scuba certification and scuba equipment.


Area(s): Interaction (Ecology & Conservation)

Level: Graduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses

BIOHOPK 290H

Teaching of Biological Science

Open to upper-division undergraduates and graduate students. Practical experience in teaching lab biology or serving as an assistant in a lecture course. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.nn (Staff)


Area(s):

Level: Graduate
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