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BIOHOPK 150H

Ecological Mechanics (BIOHOPK 250H)

(Graduate students register for 250H.) The principles of life's physical interactions. We will explore basic physics. fluid mechanics, thermal dynamics, and materials science to see how the principles of these fields can be used to investigate ecology at levels from the individual to the community. Topics include: diffusion, boundary layers, fluid-dynamic forces, locomotion, heat-budget models, fracture mechanics, adhesion, beam theory, the statistics of extremes, and the theory of self-organization. Open to students from all backgrounds. Some familiarity with basic physics and calculus advantageous but not necessary.


Area(s):
Requirements: WAY-SMA
Level: Undergraduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses

BIOHOPK 157H

Creative Writing & Science: The Artful Interpreter (BIOHOPK 257H, ENGLISH 157H)

What role does creativity play in the life of a scientist? How has science inspired great literature? How do you write accessibly and expressively about things like whales, DNA or cancer? This course begins with a field trip to Hopkins Marine Station, perched at the edge of the Pacific, where Stanford labs buzz with activity alongside barking seals and crashing waves. Here, in this spectacular setting, we learn to pay attention to our encounters with the natural world and translate sensory experience to the page. Students keep field journals to collect observations and cultivate a reflective practice. In-class writing experiments lead to original nonfiction combining personal narrative and scientific curiosity. Students workshop their projects, receiving supportive feedback from the group. You will develop a more patient and observant eye, improve your ability to articulate scientific concepts, and, hopefully, have a bit of fun along the way.


Area(s):
Requirements: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE
Level: Undergraduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses

BIOHOPK 250H

Ecological Mechanics (BIOHOPK 150H)

(Graduate students register for 250H.) The principles of life's physical interactions. We will explore basic physics. fluid mechanics, thermal dynamics, and materials science to see how the principles of these fields can be used to investigate ecology at levels from the individual to the community. Topics include: diffusion, boundary layers, fluid-dynamic forces, locomotion, heat-budget models, fracture mechanics, adhesion, beam theory, the statistics of extremes, and the theory of self-organization. Open to students from all backgrounds. Some familiarity with basic physics and calculus advantageous but not necessary.


Area(s):

Level: Graduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses

BIOHOPK 257H

Creative Writing & Science: The Artful Interpreter (BIOHOPK 157H, ENGLISH 157H)

What role does creativity play in the life of a scientist? How has science inspired great literature? How do you write accessibly and expressively about things like whales, DNA or cancer? This course begins with a field trip to Hopkins Marine Station, perched at the edge of the Pacific, where Stanford labs buzz with activity alongside barking seals and crashing waves. Here, in this spectacular setting, we learn to pay attention to our encounters with the natural world and translate sensory experience to the page. Students keep field journals to collect observations and cultivate a reflective practice. In-class writing experiments lead to original nonfiction combining personal narrative and scientific curiosity. Students workshop their projects, receiving supportive feedback from the group. You will develop a more patient and observant eye, improve your ability to articulate scientific concepts, and, hopefully, have a bit of fun along the way.


Area(s):

Level: Graduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses

Course Quarter: Autumn


BIO 3

Frontiers in Marine Biology

An introduction to contemporary research in marine biology, including ecology, conservation biology, environmental toxicology, behavior, biomechanics, evolution, neurobiology, and molecular biology. Emphasis is on new discoveries and the technologies used to make them. Weekly lectures by faculty from the Hopkins Marine Station.


Area(s):

Level: Undergraduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses

BIO 12N

Sensory Ecology of Marine Animals

Animals living in the oceans experience a highly varied range of environmental stimuli. An aquatic lifestyle requires an equally rich range of sensory adaptations, including some that are totally foreign to us. In this course we will examine sensory system in marine animals from both an environmental and behavioral perspective and from the point of view of neuroscience and information systems engineering.


Area(s):
Requirements: WAY-SMA
Level: Undergraduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses

BIOHOPK 198H

Directed Instruction or Reading

May be taken as a prelude to research and may also involve participation in a lab or research group seminar and/or library research. Credit for work arranged with out-of-department instructors restricted to Biology majors and requires department approval. May be repeated for credit. (Staff)


Area(s): Interaction (Ecology & Conservation)

Level: Undergraduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses



















































students counting life in intertidal

BIOHOPK 199H

Undergraduate Research

BIOHOPK 199H

Undergraduate Research

Qualified undergraduates undertake individual work in the fields listed under 300H. Arrangements must be made by consultation or correspondence.


Area(s):

Level: Undergraduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses



















































student doing research

BIOHOPK 300H

Research

BIOHOPK 300H

Research

Graduate study involving original work undertaken with staff in the fields indicated. B. Block: Comparative Vertebrate Physiology (biomechanics, metabolic physiology and phylogeny of pelagic fishes, evolution of endothermy); L. Crowder: Marine ecology, fisheries, bycatch, integrating science and policy, marine conservation; G. De Leo: Population dynamics and management, wildlife diseases, environmental policies and sustainable development; M. Denny: Biomechanics (the mechanical properties of biological materials and their consequences for animal size, shape, and performance); W. Gilly: Neurobiology (analysis of giant axon systems in marine invertebrates from molecular to behavioral levels); J. Goldbogen: Physiological and Behavioral Ecology (functional morphology and biomechanics of marine organisms): C. Lowe: Evolution of Development (origin of chordates, early evolution of body plans); F. Micheli: Marine Ecology (species interactions and community ecology, scale-dependent aspects of community organization, marine conservation and design of multi-species marine protected areas, behavioral ecology); S. Palumbi: Molecular Evolution (mechanisms of speciation, genetic differentiations of populations, use of molecular tools in conservation biology, design of marine protected areas); S. Thompson: Neurobiology (neuronal control of behavior and mechanisms of ion permeation, signal transduction, calcium homeostasis, and neutrotransmission); J. Watanabe: Marine Ecology (kelp forest ecology and invertebrate zoology).


Area(s):

Level: Graduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses

















































BIOHOPK 315H

Career Development for Graduate Students

The course will cover multiple skills required to succeed in graduate school and beyond, including fund raising, publishing, selecting career options, job application and negotiation, and teaching, through lectures, group discussions, and practical excercises.


Area(s):

Level: Graduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses

Course Quarter: Winter


BIO 3N

Views of a Changing Sea: Literature & Science

The state of a changing world ocean, particularly in the eastern Pacific, will be examined through historical and contemporary fiction, non-fiction and scientific publications. Issues will include harvest and mariculture fisheries, land-sea interactions and oceanic climate change in both surface and deep waters.


Area(s):
Requirements: GER: DB-NatSci
Level: Undergraduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses

BIOHOPK 198H

Directed Instruction or Reading

May be taken as a prelude to research and may also involve participation in a lab or research group seminar and/or library research. Credit for work arranged with out-of-department instructors restricted to Biology majors and requires department approval. May be repeated for credit. (Staff)


Area(s): Interaction (Ecology & Conservation)

Level: Undergraduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses



















































students counting life in intertidal

BIOHOPK 199H

Undergraduate Research

BIOHOPK 199H

Undergraduate Research

Qualified undergraduates undertake individual work in the fields listed under 300H. Arrangements must be made by consultation or correspondence.


Area(s):

Level: Undergraduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses



















































BIOHOPK 290H

Teaching of Biological Science

Open to upper-division undergraduates and graduate students. Practical experience in teaching lab biology or serving as an assistant in a lecture course. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.nn (Staff)


Area(s):

Level: Graduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses




































BIOHOPK 299H

Advanced Topics in Marine Conservation

Graduate students only. Topics will change from year to year but will include such topics as sustainable fisheries, protected areas, ocean planning, social-ecological systems, dynamic management, sustainable seafood, and impacts of climate change


Area(s):

Level: Graduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses


student doing research

BIOHOPK 300H

Research

BIOHOPK 300H

Research

Graduate study involving original work undertaken with staff in the fields indicated. B. Block: Comparative Vertebrate Physiology (biomechanics, metabolic physiology and phylogeny of pelagic fishes, evolution of endothermy); L. Crowder: Marine ecology, fisheries, bycatch, integrating science and policy, marine conservation; G. De Leo: Population dynamics and management, wildlife diseases, environmental policies and sustainable development; M. Denny: Biomechanics (the mechanical properties of biological materials and their consequences for animal size, shape, and performance); W. Gilly: Neurobiology (analysis of giant axon systems in marine invertebrates from molecular to behavioral levels); J. Goldbogen: Physiological and Behavioral Ecology (functional morphology and biomechanics of marine organisms): C. Lowe: Evolution of Development (origin of chordates, early evolution of body plans); F. Micheli: Marine Ecology (species interactions and community ecology, scale-dependent aspects of community organization, marine conservation and design of multi-species marine protected areas, behavioral ecology); S. Palumbi: Molecular Evolution (mechanisms of speciation, genetic differentiations of populations, use of molecular tools in conservation biology, design of marine protected areas); S. Thompson: Neurobiology (neuronal control of behavior and mechanisms of ion permeation, signal transduction, calcium homeostasis, and neutrotransmission); J. Watanabe: Marine Ecology (kelp forest ecology and invertebrate zoology).


Area(s):

Level: Graduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses

















































cross section of coral

BIOHOPK 330H

Scientific Writing

BIOHOPK 330H

Scientific Writing

This writer's seminar will workshop the elements of good scientific writing by focusing on a paper's Introduction. We will chart the elements of an effective Introduction, designed for different audiences and types of scientific journals. The course will provide participants with the chance to craft an Introduction to a current paper or proposal and have it evaluated in light of the ideal structure we define.


Area(s):

Level: Graduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses

Course Quarter: Spring


BIOHOPK 14

Bio-logging and Bio-telemetry

Bio-logging is a rapidly growing discipline that includes diverse fields such as consumer electronics, medicine, and marine biology. The use of animal-attached digital tags is a powerful approach to study the movement and ecology of individuals over a wide range of temporal and spatial scales. This course is an introduction to bio-logging methods and analysis. Using whales as a model system, students will learn how use multi-sensor tags to study behavioral biomechanics.


Area(s):
Requirements: WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA
Level: Undergraduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses

BIOHOPK 47

Introduction to Research in Ecology and Ecological Physiology

This course is a field-based inquiry into rocky intertidal shores that introducesnstudents to ecology and environmental physiology and the research methods used to study them. Students will learn how to detect patterns quantitatively in nature through appropriate sampling methods & statistical analysis. Following exploration of appropriate background material in class and through exploration of the scientific literature, students will learn how to formulate testable hypotheses regarding the underlying causes of the patterns they discern. A variety of different aspects of ecology and physiology will be investigated cooperatively by the students during the quarter, culminating in development of an individual final paper in the form of a research proposal based on data collected during the course. The course will provide a broad conceptual introduction to the underlying biological principles that influence adaptation to the planet┬┐s dynamic habitats, as well as inquiry-based experience in how to explore and understand complex systems in nature. nThis course fulfills the same laboratory requirement as BIO 47. Satisfies WIM in Biology.


Area(s):
Requirements: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA
Level: Undergraduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses

BIOHOPK 81

Introduction to Ecology

The course is designed to provide background on key concepts in ecology, familiarize students with key ecological processes and ecosystems, and the methods used in ecological studies. The course will further build students┬┐ skills in critical scientific thinking, reading the literature, and scientific communication. A major goal of the course is to train students to ask questions in ecology, and to design, conduct and report studies addressing these questions. Thus, emphasis is also placed, in additional to general ecological concepts, on field observations, experimental design, and the analysis, interpretation and presentation of ecological data (through computer laboratories, written assignments and presentations). Written assignments, presentations and discussions are designed to provide experience in organizing and presenting information and to expose students to multiple perspectives on ecological processes and their applications.nThis course fulfills the same requirement as BIO 81.


Area(s):

Level: Undergraduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses

rock crab

BIOHOPK 84

Physiology

BIOHOPK 84

Physiology

This course will examine basic physiological systems of vertebrate and invertebrate animals, including nerve and muscle, heart and circulation, kidney and osmoregulation, metabolism, and thermoregulation. nThis course fulfills the same requirement as BIO 84.


Area(s):

Level: Undergraduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses

brittle star

BIOHOPK 85

Evolution

BIOHOPK 85

Evolution

Principles of micro- and macro-evolution from molecular genetics to the development of biological diversity. Adaptation, divergence and natural selection in the past and in contemporary ecological settings. Evolution of humans and human-caused evolution. Emphasis on major body plans in the sea and ocean examples of major evolutionary processes.nThis course fulfills the same requirements as BIO 85.


Area(s):

Level: Undergraduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses

BIOHOPK 173HA

Marine Conservation Biology - Seminar and Discussion Only (BIOHOPK 273HA)

(Graduate students register for 273HA.). Introduction to the key concepts of ecology and policy relevant to marine conservation issues at the population to ecosystems level. Focus on the origin and maintenance of biodiversity and conservation applications from both the biology and policy perspectives (for example, endangered species, captive breeding, reserve design, habitat fragmentation, ecosystem restoration/rehabilitation). Also includes emerging approaches such as ecosystem based management, ocean planning, and coupled social-ecological systems. The course will include lectures, readings and discussions of primary literature, and attendance at seminars with visiting scholars. Prerequisite: introductory biology; suggested: a policy and/or introductory ecology course.nStudents should enroll in this course if they are only joining the seminar and discussion. Students who will engage in the full course should enroll in BIOHOPK 173H/273H.


Area(s):

Level: Undergraduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses

BIOHOPK 173H

Marine Conservation Biology (BIOHOPK 273H)

(Graduate students register for 273H.). Introduction to the key concepts of ecology and policy relevant to marine conservation issues at the population to ecosystems level. Focus on the origin and maintenance of biodiversity and conservation applications from both the biology and policy perspectives (for example, endangered species, captive breeding, reserve design, habitat fragmentation, ecosystem restoration/rehabilitation). Also includes emerging approaches such as ecosystem based management, ocean planning, and coupled social-ecological systems. The course will include lectures, readings and discussions of primary literature, and attendance at seminars with visiting scholars. Prerequisite: introductory biology; suggested: a policy and/or introductory ecology course.


Area(s): Interaction (Ecology & Conservation)

Level: Undergraduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses

BIOHOPK 174H

Experimental Design and Probability (BIOHOPK 274H)

(Graduate students register for 274H.) Variability is an integral part of biology. Introduction to probability and its use in addressing biological problems. Focus is on experimental design and the use of linear models in testing hypotheses (e.g., regression, analysis of variance, and general linear models). Students will use R to explore and analyze biological data from Monterey Bay. No programming or statistical background is assumed. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.


Area(s): Interaction (Ecology & Conservation)
Requirements: GER: DB-NatSci, GER:DB-Math, WAY-AQR, WAY-FR
Level: Undergraduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses


BIOHOPK 182H

Stanford at Sea (BIOHOPK 323H, EARTHSYS 323, ESS 323)

(Graduate students register for 323H.) Five weeks of marine science including oceanography, marine physiology, policy, maritime studies, conservation, and nautical science at Hopkins Marine Station, followed by five weeks at sea aboard a sailing research vessel in the Pacific Ocean. Shore component comprised of three multidisciplinary courses meeting daily and continuing aboard ship. Students develop an independent research project plan while ashore, and carry out the research at sea. In collaboration with the Sea Education Association of Woods Hole, MA. Only 6 units may count towards the Biology major.


Area(s): Interaction (Ecology & Conservation)
Requirements: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA
Level: Undergraduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses

BIOHOPK 198H

Directed Instruction or Reading

May be taken as a prelude to research and may also involve participation in a lab or research group seminar and/or library research. Credit for work arranged with out-of-department instructors restricted to Biology majors and requires department approval. May be repeated for credit. (Staff)


Area(s): Interaction (Ecology & Conservation)

Level: Undergraduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses



















































students counting life in intertidal

BIOHOPK 199H

Undergraduate Research

BIOHOPK 199H

Undergraduate Research

Qualified undergraduates undertake individual work in the fields listed under 300H. Arrangements must be made by consultation or correspondence.


Area(s):

Level: Undergraduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses



















































BIOHOPK 234H

Topics in Comparative and Environmental Physiology

Seminar and discussion focused on current topics and research at the interface of physiology and ecology


Area(s): Function (Physiology & Biomechanics)

Level: Graduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses

BIOHOPK 273HA

Marine Conservation Biology - Seminar and Discussion Only (BIOHOPK 173HA)

(Graduate students register for 273HA.). Introduction to the key concepts of ecology and policy relevant to marine conservation issues at the population to ecosystems level. Focus on the origin and maintenance of biodiversity and conservation applications from both the biology and policy perspectives (for example, endangered species, captive breeding, reserve design, habitat fragmentation, ecosystem restoration/rehabilitation). Also includes emerging approaches such as ecosystem based management, ocean planning, and coupled social-ecological systems. The course will include lectures, readings and discussions of primary literature, and attendance at seminars with visiting scholars. Prerequisite: introductory biology; suggested: a policy and/or introductory ecology course.nStudents should enroll in this course if they are only joining the seminar and discussion. Students who will engage in the full course should enroll in BIOHOPK 173H/273H.


Area(s):

Level: Graduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses

BIOHOPK 273H

Marine Conservation Biology (BIOHOPK 173H)

(Graduate students register for 273H.). Introduction to the key concepts of ecology and policy relevant to marine conservation issues at the population to ecosystems level. Focus on the origin and maintenance of biodiversity and conservation applications from both the biology and policy perspectives (for example, endangered species, captive breeding, reserve design, habitat fragmentation, ecosystem restoration/rehabilitation). Also includes emerging approaches such as ecosystem based management, ocean planning, and coupled social-ecological systems. The course will include lectures, readings and discussions of primary literature, and attendance at seminars with visiting scholars. Prerequisite: introductory biology; suggested: a policy and/or introductory ecology course.


Area(s): Interaction (Ecology & Conservation)

Level: Graduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses

BIOHOPK 274H

Experimental Design and Probability (BIOHOPK 174H)

(Graduate students register for 274H.) Variability is an integral part of biology. Introduction to probability and its use in addressing biological problems. Focus is on experimental design and the use of linear models in testing hypotheses (e.g., regression, analysis of variance, and general linear models). Students will use R to explore and analyze biological data from Monterey Bay. No programming or statistical background is assumed. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.


Area(s):

Level: Graduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses


BIOHOPK 290H

Teaching of Biological Science

Open to upper-division undergraduates and graduate students. Practical experience in teaching lab biology or serving as an assistant in a lecture course. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.nn (Staff)


Area(s):

Level: Graduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses




































BIOHOPK 299H

Advanced Topics in Marine Conservation

Graduate students only. Topics will change from year to year but will include such topics as sustainable fisheries, protected areas, ocean planning, social-ecological systems, dynamic management, sustainable seafood, and impacts of climate change


Area(s):

Level: Graduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses


student doing research

BIOHOPK 300H

Research

BIOHOPK 300H

Research

Graduate study involving original work undertaken with staff in the fields indicated. B. Block: Comparative Vertebrate Physiology (biomechanics, metabolic physiology and phylogeny of pelagic fishes, evolution of endothermy); L. Crowder: Marine ecology, fisheries, bycatch, integrating science and policy, marine conservation; G. De Leo: Population dynamics and management, wildlife diseases, environmental policies and sustainable development; M. Denny: Biomechanics (the mechanical properties of biological materials and their consequences for animal size, shape, and performance); W. Gilly: Neurobiology (analysis of giant axon systems in marine invertebrates from molecular to behavioral levels); J. Goldbogen: Physiological and Behavioral Ecology (functional morphology and biomechanics of marine organisms): C. Lowe: Evolution of Development (origin of chordates, early evolution of body plans); F. Micheli: Marine Ecology (species interactions and community ecology, scale-dependent aspects of community organization, marine conservation and design of multi-species marine protected areas, behavioral ecology); S. Palumbi: Molecular Evolution (mechanisms of speciation, genetic differentiations of populations, use of molecular tools in conservation biology, design of marine protected areas); S. Thompson: Neurobiology (neuronal control of behavior and mechanisms of ion permeation, signal transduction, calcium homeostasis, and neutrotransmission); J. Watanabe: Marine Ecology (kelp forest ecology and invertebrate zoology).


Area(s):

Level: Graduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses

















































BIOHOPK 323H

Stanford at Sea (BIOHOPK 182H, EARTHSYS 323, ESS 323)

(Graduate students register for 323H.) Five weeks of marine science including oceanography, marine physiology, policy, maritime studies, conservation, and nautical science at Hopkins Marine Station, followed by five weeks at sea aboard a sailing research vessel in the Pacific Ocean. Shore component comprised of three multidisciplinary courses meeting daily and continuing aboard ship. Students develop an independent research project plan while ashore, and carry out the research at sea. In collaboration with the Sea Education Association of Woods Hole, MA. Only 6 units may count towards the Biology major.


Area(s): Interaction (Ecology & Conservation)

Level: Graduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses

Course Quarter: Summer


BIOHOPK 185H

Ecology and Conservation of Kelp Forest Communities (BIOHOPK 285H)

(Graduate students register for 285H.) Five week course. Daily lectures, labs, and scuba dives focused on kelp forest biology. Topics include identification and natural history of resident organisms, ecological processes that maintain biodiversity and community organization, field methods, data analysis, and research diving techniques. Class projects contribute to ongoing studies associated with Hopkins Marine Life Observatory. It is recommended that students complete one of Stanford's Scientific Diver Training sessions, offered during spring break and the week before the course starts, although this is not a requirement. Prerequisites: consent of instructor; advanced scuba certification and scuba equipment.


Area(s):
Requirements: WAY-SMA
Level: Undergraduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses

BIOHOPK 198H

Directed Instruction or Reading

May be taken as a prelude to research and may also involve participation in a lab or research group seminar and/or library research. Credit for work arranged with out-of-department instructors restricted to Biology majors and requires department approval. May be repeated for credit. (Staff)


Area(s): Interaction (Ecology & Conservation)

Level: Undergraduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses



















































students counting life in intertidal

BIOHOPK 199H

Undergraduate Research

BIOHOPK 199H

Undergraduate Research

Qualified undergraduates undertake individual work in the fields listed under 300H. Arrangements must be made by consultation or correspondence.


Area(s):

Level: Undergraduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses



















































BIOHOPK 274

Hopkins Microbiology Course (BIO 274S, CEE 274S, ESS 253S)

(Formerly GES 274S.) Four-week, intensive. The interplay between molecular, physiological, ecological, evolutionary, and geochemical processes that constitute, cause, and maintain microbial diversity. How to isolate key microorganisms driving marine biological and geochemical diversity, interpret culture-independent molecular characterization of microbial species, and predict causes and consequences. Laboratory component: what constitutes physiological and metabolic microbial diversity; how evolutionary and ecological processes diversify individual cells into physiologically heterogeneous populations; and the principles of interactions between individuals, their population, and other biological entities in a dynamically changing microbial ecosystem. Prerequisites: CEE 274A and CEE 274B, or equivalents.


Area(s):

Level: Graduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses

BIOHOPK 285H

Ecology and Conservation of Kelp Forest Communities (BIOHOPK 185H)

(Graduate students register for 285H.) Five week course. Daily lectures, labs, and scuba dives focused on kelp forest biology. Topics include identification and natural history of resident organisms, ecological processes that maintain biodiversity and community organization, field methods, data analysis, and research diving techniques. Class projects contribute to ongoing studies associated with Hopkins Marine Life Observatory. It is recommended that students complete one of Stanford's Scientific Diver Training sessions, offered during spring break and the week before the course starts, although this is not a requirement. Prerequisites: consent of instructor; advanced scuba certification and scuba equipment.


Area(s): Interaction (Ecology & Conservation)

Level: Graduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses

BIOHOPK 290H

Teaching of Biological Science

Open to upper-division undergraduates and graduate students. Practical experience in teaching lab biology or serving as an assistant in a lecture course. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.nn (Staff)


Area(s):

Level: Graduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses




































student doing research

BIOHOPK 300H

Research

BIOHOPK 300H

Research

Graduate study involving original work undertaken with staff in the fields indicated. B. Block: Comparative Vertebrate Physiology (biomechanics, metabolic physiology and phylogeny of pelagic fishes, evolution of endothermy); L. Crowder: Marine ecology, fisheries, bycatch, integrating science and policy, marine conservation; G. De Leo: Population dynamics and management, wildlife diseases, environmental policies and sustainable development; M. Denny: Biomechanics (the mechanical properties of biological materials and their consequences for animal size, shape, and performance); W. Gilly: Neurobiology (analysis of giant axon systems in marine invertebrates from molecular to behavioral levels); J. Goldbogen: Physiological and Behavioral Ecology (functional morphology and biomechanics of marine organisms): C. Lowe: Evolution of Development (origin of chordates, early evolution of body plans); F. Micheli: Marine Ecology (species interactions and community ecology, scale-dependent aspects of community organization, marine conservation and design of multi-species marine protected areas, behavioral ecology); S. Palumbi: Molecular Evolution (mechanisms of speciation, genetic differentiations of populations, use of molecular tools in conservation biology, design of marine protected areas); S. Thompson: Neurobiology (neuronal control of behavior and mechanisms of ion permeation, signal transduction, calcium homeostasis, and neutrotransmission); J. Watanabe: Marine Ecology (kelp forest ecology and invertebrate zoology).


Area(s):

Level: Graduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses