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Courses

BIOHOPK 142H

Historical Ecology of Marine InvertebratesnnHistorical ecology of marine invertebrates (BIOHOPK 242H)

This course is an exploration of the local invertebrate fauna at Hopkins Marine Station, through the lens of a long-term monitoring study initiated by Hewatt in 1931. During week 1, lectures will provide an overview of the major phyla represented on rocky intertidal shores. In the laboratory, students will focus on species identification. These skills will be put to use in week 2, when we will quantify patterns of invertebrate biodiversity along the Hewatt transect. During week 3, students will investigate a relevant taxonomic or quantitative problem. This course will meet 12-5pm, Monday-Friday. January 13-31, 2020. Open to graduate students; undergraduate students may enroll with consent of instructor.


Area(s):

Level: Undergraduate
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BIOHOPK 198H

Directed Instruction or Reading

May be taken as a prelude to research and may also involve participation in a lab or research group seminar and/or library research. Credit for work arranged with out-of-department instructors restricted to Biology majors and requires department approval. May be repeated for credit. (Staff)


Area(s):

Level: Undergraduate
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BIOHOPK 199H

Undergraduate Research

BIOHOPK 199H

Undergraduate Research

Qualified undergraduates undertake individual work in the fields listed under 300H. Arrangements must be made by consultation or correspondence.


Area(s):

Level: Undergraduate
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BIOHOPK 242H

Historical Ecology of Marine InvertebratesnnHistorical ecology of marine invertebrates (BIOHOPK 142H)

This course is an exploration of the local invertebrate fauna at Hopkins Marine Station, through the lens of a long-term monitoring study initiated by Hewatt in 1931. During week 1, lectures will provide an overview of the major phyla represented on rocky intertidal shores. In the laboratory, students will focus on species identification. These skills will be put to use in week 2, when we will quantify patterns of invertebrate biodiversity along the Hewatt transect. During week 3, students will investigate a relevant taxonomic or quantitative problem. This course will meet 12-5pm, Monday-Friday. January 13-31, 2020. Open to graduate students; undergraduate students may enroll with consent of instructor.


Area(s):

Level: Graduate
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BIOHOPK 300H

Research

BIOHOPK 300H

Research

Graduate study involving original work undertaken with staff in the fields indicated. B. Block: Comparative Vertebrate Physiology (biomechanics, metabolic physiology and phylogeny of pelagic fishes, evolution of endothermy); L. Crowder: Marine ecology, fisheries, bycatch, integrating science and policy, marine conservation; G. De Leo: Population dynamics and management, wildlife diseases, environmental policies and sustainable development; M. Denny: Biomechanics (the mechanical properties of biological materials and their consequences for animal size, shape, and performance); W. Gilly: Neurobiology (analysis of giant axon systems in marine invertebrates from molecular to behavioral levels); J. Goldbogen: Physiological and Behavioral Ecology (functional morphology and biomechanics of marine organisms): C. Lowe: Evolution of Development (origin of chordates, early evolution of body plans); F. Micheli: Marine Ecology (species interactions and community ecology, scale-dependent aspects of community organization, marine conservation and design of multi-species marine protected areas, behavioral ecology); S. Palumbi: Molecular Evolution (mechanisms of speciation, genetic differentiations of populations, use of molecular tools in conservation biology, design of marine protected areas); S. Thompson: Neurobiology (neuronal control of behavior and mechanisms of ion permeation, signal transduction, calcium homeostasis, and neutrotransmission); J. Watanabe: Marine Ecology (kelp forest ecology and invertebrate zoology).


Area(s):

Level: Graduate
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Course Quarter: Autumn


BIO 3

Frontiers in Marine Biology

An introduction to contemporary research in marine biology, including ecology, conservation biology, environmental toxicology, behavior, biomechanics, evolution, neurobiology, and molecular biology. Emphasis is on new discoveries and the technologies used to make them. Weekly lectures by faculty from the Hopkins Marine Station.


Area(s): Function (Physiology & Biomechanics), Change (Development & Evolution), Interaction (Ecology & Conservation)

Level: Undergraduate
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BIO 12N

Sensory Ecology of Marine Animals

Animals living in the oceans experience a highly varied range of environmental stimuli. An aquatic lifestyle requires an equally rich range of sensory adaptations, including some that are totally foreign to us. In this course we will examine sensory system in marine animals from both an environmental and behavioral perspective and from the point of view of neuroscience and information systems engineering.


Area(s):
Requirements: WAY-SMA
Level: Undergraduate
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BIOHOPK 315H

Career Development for Graduate Students

The course will cover multiple skills required to succeed in graduate school and beyond, including fund raising, publishing, selecting career options, job application and negotiation, and teaching, through lectures, group discussions, and practical excercises.


Area(s):

Level: Graduate
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Course Quarter: Winter


BIOHOPK 140H

Statistical Modeling (BIOHOPK 240H)

(Graduate students register for 240H.) Introduction to applied statistical modeling in a Bayesian framework. Topics will include probability, regression, model comparison, and hierarchical modeling. We will take a hands-on, computational approach (R, Stan) to gain intuition so that students can later design their own inferential models. Prerequisites for this course include introductory statistics and some calculus or linear algebra, as well as previous exposure to scientific computing. Open to graduate students; undergraduate students may enroll with consent of instructor.


Area(s):

Level: Undergraduate
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BIOHOPK 157H

Creative Writing & Science: The Artful Interpreter (BIOHOPK 257H, ENGLISH 157H)

What role does creativity play in the life of a scientist? How has science inspired great literature? How do you write accessibly and expressively about things like whales, DNA or cancer? This course begins with a field trip to Hopkins Marine Station where Stanford labs buzz with activity alongside barking seals and crashing waves. The trip provides a unique opportunity for students to directly engage with marine animals, coastal habitats and environmental concerns of Monterey Bay. As historian Jill Lepore writes of Rachel Carson: ¿She could not have written Silent Spring if she hadn¿t, for decades, scrambled down rocks, rolled up her pant legs, and waded into tide pools, thinking about how one thing can change another...¿ Back on campus students will complete and workshop three original nonfiction essays that explore the intersection between personal narrative and scientific curiosity. You will develop a more patient and observant eye and improve your ability to articulate scientific concepts to a general readership. **This course takes place on main campus and is open to all students. nNOTE: Students must attend the first class meeting to retain their roster spot.


Area(s):
Requirements: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE
Level: Undergraduate
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BIOHOPK 161H

Invertebrate Zoology (BIOHOPK 261H)

(Graduate students register for 261H.) Survey of invertebrate diversity emphasizing form and function in a phylogenetic framework. Morphological diversity, life histories, physiology, and ecology of the major invertebrate groups, concentrating on local marine forms as examples. Current views on the phylogenetic relationships and evolution of the invertebrates. Lectures, lab, plus field trips. Satisfies Central Menu Area 3 for Bio majors.


Area(s): Function (Physiology & Biomechanics), Change (Development & Evolution), Interaction (Ecology & Conservation)
Requirements: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA
Level: Undergraduate
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BIOHOPK 240H

Statistical Modeling (BIOHOPK 140H)

(Graduate students register for 240H.) Introduction to applied statistical modeling in a Bayesian framework. Topics will include probability, regression, model comparison, and hierarchical modeling. We will take a hands-on, computational approach (R, Stan) to gain intuition so that students can later design their own inferential models. Prerequisites for this course include introductory statistics and some calculus or linear algebra, as well as previous exposure to scientific computing. Open to graduate students; undergraduate students may enroll with consent of instructor.


Area(s):

Level: Graduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses

BIOHOPK 257H

Creative Writing & Science: The Artful Interpreter (BIOHOPK 157H, ENGLISH 157H)

What role does creativity play in the life of a scientist? How has science inspired great literature? How do you write accessibly and expressively about things like whales, DNA or cancer? This course begins with a field trip to Hopkins Marine Station where Stanford labs buzz with activity alongside barking seals and crashing waves. The trip provides a unique opportunity for students to directly engage with marine animals, coastal habitats and environmental concerns of Monterey Bay. As historian Jill Lepore writes of Rachel Carson: ¿She could not have written Silent Spring if she hadn¿t, for decades, scrambled down rocks, rolled up her pant legs, and waded into tide pools, thinking about how one thing can change another...¿ Back on campus students will complete and workshop three original nonfiction essays that explore the intersection between personal narrative and scientific curiosity. You will develop a more patient and observant eye and improve your ability to articulate scientific concepts to a general readership. **This course takes place on main campus and is open to all students. nNOTE: Students must attend the first class meeting to retain their roster spot.


Area(s):

Level: Graduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses

BIOHOPK 261H

Invertebrate Zoology (BIOHOPK 161H)

(Graduate students register for 261H.) Survey of invertebrate diversity emphasizing form and function in a phylogenetic framework. Morphological diversity, life histories, physiology, and ecology of the major invertebrate groups, concentrating on local marine forms as examples. Current views on the phylogenetic relationships and evolution of the invertebrates. Lectures, lab, plus field trips. Satisfies Central Menu Area 3 for Bio majors.


Area(s): Function (Physiology & Biomechanics), Change (Development & Evolution), Interaction (Ecology & Conservation)

Level: Graduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses

BIOHOPK 290H

Teaching Practicum in Biology

Open to upper-division undergraduates and graduate students. Practical supervised teaching experience in a biology or lecture course. Training often includes attending lectures, initiating and planning discussion sections, and assisting in the preparation of course materials. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.


Area(s):

Level: Graduate
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BIOHOPK 299H

Advanced Topics in Marine Conservation

Graduate students only. Topics will change from year to year but will include such topics as sustainable fisheries, protected areas, ocean planning, social-ecological systems, dynamic management, sustainable seafood, and impacts of climate change


Area(s): Interaction (Ecology & Conservation)

Level: Graduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses


BIOHOPK 330H

Scientific Writing

BIOHOPK 330H

Scientific Writing

This writer's seminar will workshop the elements of good scientific writing by focusing on a paper's Introduction. We will chart the elements of an effective Introduction, designed for different audiences and types of scientific journals. The course will provide participants with the chance to craft an Introduction to a current paper or proposal and have it evaluated in light of the ideal structure we define.


Area(s):

Level: Graduate
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Course Quarter: Spring


BIO 3N

Views of a Changing Sea: Literature & Science

The state of a changing world ocean, particularly in the eastern Pacific, will be examined through historical and contemporary fiction, non-fiction and scientific publications. Issues will include harvest and mariculture fisheries, land-sea interactions and oceanic climate change in both surface and deep waters.


Area(s): Function (Physiology & Biomechanics), Change (Development & Evolution), Interaction (Ecology & Conservation)
Requirements: GER: DB-NatSci
Level: Undergraduate
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BIOHOPK 174H

Experimental Design and Probability (BIOHOPK 274H)

(Graduate students register for 274H.) Variability is an integral part of biology. Introduction to probability and its use in designing experiments to address biological problems. Focus is on experimental design and the use of linear models in testing hypotheses (e.g., analysis of variance, regression). Students will use R to explore and analyze locally relevant biological datasets. No programming or statistical background is assumed. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.


Area(s):
Requirements: GER: DB-NatSci, GER:DB-Math, WAY-AQR, WAY-FR
Level: Undergraduate
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BIOHOPK 175H

Marine Science and Conservation in a Changing World (BIOHOPK 275H)

Graduate students register for 275H. This hands-on, experiential course provides a broad foundation in marine science, and explores emerging opportunities for innovation in the study of life in the sea. Students are resident at Stanford¿s Hopkins Marine Station in Pacific Grove (90 miles south of main campus) where the diverse organisms and environments of Monterey Bay provide the focus for the course. Class meets daily with lectures, discussions, labs, and field work throughout the day. Three linked concentrations¿each 3 weeks long¿are taught sequentially to address (1) the extraordinary diversity of marine organisms and habitats, (2) the physiology and behavior of marine animals, and (3) the principles of marine ecology. Connecting these concentrations is a weekly seminar-based discussion of topics in marine conservation. This design permits deep concentration on each subject, and places emphasis on discussion, group dialog, individual exploration, and experiential learning. In the final week of the quarter, students complete an individual capstone project of their choosing. This course fulfills the same laboratory requirement as BIO 47.


Area(s): Function (Physiology & Biomechanics), Change (Development & Evolution), Interaction (Ecology & Conservation)

Level: Undergraduate
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BIOHOPK 234H

Topics in Comparative and Environmental Physiology

Seminar and discussion focused on current topics and research at the interface of physiology and ecology


Area(s):

Level: Graduate
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BIOHOPK 274H

Experimental Design and Probability (BIOHOPK 174H)

(Graduate students register for 274H.) Variability is an integral part of biology. Introduction to probability and its use in designing experiments to address biological problems. Focus is on experimental design and the use of linear models in testing hypotheses (e.g., analysis of variance, regression). Students will use R to explore and analyze locally relevant biological datasets. No programming or statistical background is assumed. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.


Area(s):

Level: Graduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses

BIOHOPK 275H

Marine Science and Conservation in a Changing World (BIOHOPK 175H)

Graduate students register for 275H. This hands-on, experiential course provides a broad foundation in marine science, and explores emerging opportunities for innovation in the study of life in the sea. Students are resident at Stanford¿s Hopkins Marine Station in Pacific Grove (90 miles south of main campus) where the diverse organisms and environments of Monterey Bay provide the focus for the course. Class meets daily with lectures, discussions, labs, and field work throughout the day. Three linked concentrations¿each 3 weeks long¿are taught sequentially to address (1) the extraordinary diversity of marine organisms and habitats, (2) the physiology and behavior of marine animals, and (3) the principles of marine ecology. Connecting these concentrations is a weekly seminar-based discussion of topics in marine conservation. This design permits deep concentration on each subject, and places emphasis on discussion, group dialog, individual exploration, and experiential learning. In the final week of the quarter, students complete an individual capstone project of their choosing. This course fulfills the same laboratory requirement as BIO 47.


Area(s): Function (Physiology & Biomechanics), Change (Development & Evolution), Interaction (Ecology & Conservation)

Level: Graduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses

BIOHOPK 290H

Teaching Practicum in Biology

Open to upper-division undergraduates and graduate students. Practical supervised teaching experience in a biology or lecture course. Training often includes attending lectures, initiating and planning discussion sections, and assisting in the preparation of course materials. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.


Area(s):

Level: Graduate
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BIOHOPK 291H

Teaching of Stanford at Sea

Only open to graduate students who are teaching assistants for Stanford at Sea. Provides practical experience in teaching field oceanography and marine biology. Serving as an assistant in a lecture course (five weeks) is coupled with acting as a laboratory teaching assistant on board an oceanographic research vessel during a five-week research cruise with the Stanford at Sea course. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.


Area(s):

Level: Graduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses


BIOHOPK 299H

Advanced Topics in Marine Conservation

Graduate students only. Topics will change from year to year but will include such topics as sustainable fisheries, protected areas, ocean planning, social-ecological systems, dynamic management, sustainable seafood, and impacts of climate change


Area(s): Interaction (Ecology & Conservation)

Level: Graduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses


Course Quarter: Summer


BIOHOPK 185H

Ecology and Conservation of Kelp Forest Communities (BIOHOPK 285H)

(Graduate students register for 285H.) Five week course. Daily lectures, labs, and scuba dives focused on scientific diving and quantitative ecological methods in kelp forests.. Topics include identification and natural history of resident organisms, ecological processes, and subtidal field techniques. Class projects contribute to long-term monitoring at Hopkins Marine Station. It is recommended (but not required) that students complete the Stanford Scientific Diver Training session, typically offered prior to the start of the course. Prerequisites: consent of instructor; rescue scuba certification and scuba equipment.


Area(s): Function (Physiology & Biomechanics), Interaction (Ecology & Conservation)
Requirements: WAY-SMA
Level: Undergraduate
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BIOHOPK 285H

Ecology and Conservation of Kelp Forest Communities (BIOHOPK 185H)

(Graduate students register for 285H.) Five week course. Daily lectures, labs, and scuba dives focused on scientific diving and quantitative ecological methods in kelp forests.. Topics include identification and natural history of resident organisms, ecological processes, and subtidal field techniques. Class projects contribute to long-term monitoring at Hopkins Marine Station. It is recommended (but not required) that students complete the Stanford Scientific Diver Training session, typically offered prior to the start of the course. Prerequisites: consent of instructor; rescue scuba certification and scuba equipment.


Area(s): Function (Physiology & Biomechanics), Interaction (Ecology & Conservation)

Level: Graduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses

BIOHOPK 290H

Teaching Practicum in Biology

Open to upper-division undergraduates and graduate students. Practical supervised teaching experience in a biology or lecture course. Training often includes attending lectures, initiating and planning discussion sections, and assisting in the preparation of course materials. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.


Area(s):

Level: Graduate
View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses